Don’t Miss this Historic Performance Honoring U.S. Service Members

Montrose Counseling Center is proud to be a Bronze Star supporter of Bayou City Performing Arts much-anticipated March concert, Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell – Coming Out Under Fire.

The Gay Men’s Chorus of Houston presents an entire show dedicated this historic period. It is the first time a GLBT chorus in the country has done a musical tribute to the brave men and women who have courageously served our country in the U.S. military. On March 24, Staff Sergeant Eric Alva, a Purple Heart Medal recipient and the first Marine seriously injured in the Iraq War will be the special guest host at the 7:30 p.m. performance at Cullen Theater at Wortham Center – Houston. He will be joined by Colonel Terrel Preston, U.S. Air Force (RET) and Operation Iraqi Freedom Intelligence Analyst, Jacobi Montgomery of the U.S. Army. Other guests include the Bayou City Women’s Chorus, the Sam Houston State University Musical Theater performers and dancers, with Color Guard provided by the U.S. VETS.

Ticket prices are $30, $40 and $50 and are available online or by phone at 713.521.7464.

Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell – Coming Out Under Fire features a variety of beautiful and entertaining musical selections portraying the hurdles and struggles of thousands of service men and women who were dismissed because of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” Alva, Preston and Montgomery will share their stories of love and resilience that helped them to survive the hostile environment in order to serve their country.

The chorus will perform protest songs such as “Hope for Tomorrow,” “This is the Moment;” love songs such as “Secret Love,” “Finally Here;” different versions of songs titled “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell;” Broadway songs such as “Do You Hear the People Sing?” satire songs such as “In the Navy,” “Color Out of Colorado,” “In the Closet” patriotic songs such as “The American Creed,” “America the Beautiful;” and many more.

We hope you will join us at the concert to pay our respects to our veterans, current service men and women, and the many people who fought and the won the battle to allow gays and lesbians to serve openly in the military.